rob mclennan

mclennan

interviews editor

Born in Ottawa, Canada’s glorious capital city, rob mclennan currently lives in Ottawa, where he has now lived for more than half his life. The author of nearly thirty trade books of poetry, fiction and non-fiction, he won the John Newlove Poetry Award in 2010, the Council for the Arts in Ottawa Mid-Career Award in 2014, and was longlisted for the CBC Poetry Prize in 2012. His most recent titles include notes and dispatches: essays (Insomniac press, 2014), The Uncertainty Principle: stories, (Chaudiere Books, 2014) and the poetry collection If suppose we are a fragment (BuschekBooks, 2014). An editor and publisher, he runs above/ground press, Chaudiere Books, The Garneau Review (ottawater.com/garneaureview), seventeen seconds: a journal of poetry and poetics (ottawater.com/seventeenseconds), Touch the Donkey (touchthedonkey.blogspot.com) and the Ottawa poetry pdf annual ottawater (ottawater.com). He spent the 2007-8 academic year in Edmonton as writer-in-residence at the University of Alberta, and regularly posts reviews, essays, interviews and other notices at robmclennan.blogspot.com


About Submissions

I seek interviews, predominantly (but not exclusively) with poets. I am interested in an interview with someone who isn’t interviewed often, or an interview that works to ask new questions of a particular writer...Who haven’t we heard from yet? What writer, in your opinion, deserves further attention? I want readers to be able to gain insight and appreciation of a writer through the exchange.

If you are sending a query, let me know what else you’ve done and about the subject of your interview. If you are sending a finished interview, please send as .doc with a short introduction, a bio of the interviewer and a photo to include with piece.

Read what I have to say On the Art of the Interview at The Town Crier. Send submissions to rob [at] QueenMobs.com.
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